Region 5 (Bicol Region) : (Filipino: Kabikulan; Spanish: Bicolandia)

Located in the southernmost tip of Luzon Island, the largest island in the Philippines.

Masbate City, Islands Philippines

Masbate Philippines, Geography, Climate, Economy, Major Industries, History, Political System, Getting There, Topography
Slope, Infrastructure, Beaches and Resorts, Investment Guide, Investment Opportunities, Links and References

Tourist Attractions - Natural Attractions, Cultural Attractions, Man-Made Attractions Feasts and Festivals
Special Interest
Rodeo Filipino, Limestone Hills, Catandayangan Falls, Aroroy Beach, Bat-Ongan Caves, Underwater Caves


Masbate History

When Captain Luis Enriquez de Guzman anchored on the shores of Masbate in 1569, he found tiny settlements spread along the coasts engaged in a flourishing trade with China. Chinese traders visited Masbate and found small settlements during the Shri-Vijaya and Madjapahit periods. Ruins of cave-like dwellings resembling “kiva,” possibly built by Indians who accompanied the Chinese traders, were found along the coast of Aroroy, Palanas, and Masbate. Porcelain jars dating back to the 10th century were excavated at Kalanay (Aroroy) in the 1930s.

Historic accounts show that the Christianization of the Bicol Region actually began in Masbate in 1569. Father Alonso Jimenez was the first missionary to the islands of Masbate, Burias, Leyte, and Samar. Then he went to Ibalon (Bicol) in the province of Camarines, where he resided for many years, and made many religious incursions into Albay and Sorsogon. Fray Jimenez is considered the apostle of the island of Masbate.

In December 1600 Dutch Commander Admiral Oliver van Noorth sought refuge at San Jacinto Harbor after his fleet lost to the Spanish Armada in Manila. He was later engaged in a fierce clash with Limahong’s fleet at the Canlibas-Matabao passage.

At the height of the Galleon trade, Mobo contributed first class lumber for the construction of galleons, making it the center of trade in the province apart from having been the provincial capital in the early part of the Spanish occupation.

The Americans came to Masbate in 1900 to extend their pacification campaign. In December 1908, Masbate was annexed to the province of Sorsogon. A bill declaring Masbate as an independent province was approved on February 1, 1922.

As early as 1906, the Masbate representative made the proposal to the United States Congress to grant the Philippines its independence.

The first Japanese elements arrived in Masbate at dawn on January 7, 1942 from Legazpi. They landed in several places without facing opposition – the province was too stunned to mount any resistance. The Japanese occupation reduced Masbate to economic shambles. Economic activities were limited to fishing, buying/selling or stealing. Food production ground to a halt. Camote, pakol, banana blossoms, pith, and even such obscure fruits as barobo were used as food substitutes. Lakan-bulan served as cigarette, tea or coffee. Barter transaction prevailed. For lack of nutrition and sanitation, many people succumbed to beri-beri or malaria. Lice and tick infestations spread to an unlucky few.

Dr. Mateo S. Pecso, who was governor of the province, having refused to cooperate with the Japanese, evacuated the provincial government to Guiom, a command post used by the guerillas. Pecson was eventually arrested by the Japanese and incarcerated in Cavite. He managed to escape; he later joined the guerilla movement in Central Luzon.

Dr. Emilio B. Espinosa, the lone house representative of Masbate, fought against a congressional bill authorizing the conscription of Filipinos into service of Imperial Japan and for this he was detained in Fort Santiago.

When Masbate was formally liberated on April 3, 1945, Pecso was sent to Masbate by President Osmeña to organize the civil government. Pecso took reins of government on May 11, 1945.

   

Philippine Cuisine Island Philippines

Dishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas, of Spanish origin. Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce). More details at Philippine Cuisine Island Philippines

MASBATE FAST FACTS

  LOCATION

:

  Central  Philippines
  REGION

:

  Region V - Bicol
  LAND AREA

:

  404,770 Has.
  MUNICIPALITY

:

  21
  BARANGAY

:

  550
  HOUSEHOLD :   128,860
  POPULATION :   653,852 (1995) Census
  POPULATION GROWTH

:

  9.16% (1990-1995)
  LITERACY RATE

:

  95.90%
  DIALECT :   Masbaneto, Cebuano, 
        Hiligaynon and Bicolano
  CLIMATE

:

  Type II and III
  MAJOR PRODUCTS

:

  Copra, Aquamarine,
        Cattle and Gold

Masbate Philippines, Masbate Geography, Masbate Climate, Economy, Masbate Major Industries, Masbate History, Masbate Political System, Masbate :Getting There, Masbate Topography, Masbate Slope, Masbate Infrastructure, Masbate Beaches and Resorts, Masbate Investment Guide, Masbate Investment Opportunities, Masbate Links and References

Masbate Tourist Attractions - Masbate Natural Attractions, Masbate Cultural Attractions, Masbate Man-Made Attractions Masbate Feasts and Festivals
Special Interest
Masbate Rodeo Filipino, Limestone Hills, Masbate Catandayangan Falls, Masbate Aroroy Beach, Masbate Bat-Ongan Caves, Masbate Underwater Caves

Albay, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, Masbate and Sorsogon - BICOL REGION Advertising

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